The five best restaurants in Addis Ababa

Oda Cultural Restaurant and Cafe

Inside the Oromo Cultural Center is the Oda Restaurant and Cafe, which you might recognise from Anthony Bourdain’s Ethiopia visit onNo Reservations. The Oromo are one of the largest ethnic groups in eastern Africa, and the Center’s restaurant showcases the best of Oromo culture. The hall is furnished with pinewood-carved furniture and curtains made of traditional fabric. Injera made of tikur teff (a black grain about the size of a poppy seed considered to be more nutritious than the more refined white teff), spiced butter and beso (roasted and ground barley) are at the heart of Oromo cuisine. Chumbo is prepared with black teff baked thick and yoghurt, cheese, and spiced butter spilled on top so that it looks like cake. Buna qalaa (roasted coffee dipped in butter) is a cultural snack that gives coffee deeper flavours. The Oromo Cultural Center is near the National Stadium.

Puagmea African Restaurant

Addis Ababa is the diplomatic capital of the Africa, so every country on the landmass is represented here. To sample cuisine from all over the continent without travelling too far, head to Puagmea African Restaurant. Located near the Bole International Airport behind the DHGeda Tower, Puagmea is decked out with paintings, traditional chairs and the coffee ceremony décor typical to Ethiopia. Among the dishes on the menu are ugali (a staple of the Great Lakes region made of millet, corn or sorghum boiled into a sticky porridge) and nyama choma (a Kenyan dish of grilled bone-in lamb, chicken or Nile perch fish). Live music is also on the table with DJs on Thursday nights and jazz on Saturday evenings.

Chane’s Restaurant

In the heart of the Cazanches district near a stack of popular chain hotels, delicious Ethiopian fare is served up in a centuries-old house once owned by a military hero. The house preserves the 19th-century way of life with old artworks and black-and-white photographs of royals and foreign dignitaries. From the kitchen drifts the aroma of traditional Ethiopian dishes served by the famous chef Chanyalew Mekonen (aka Chane). After cooking at the German Embassy and preparing meals for the Emperor of Ethiopia, he’s now running the show at his own restaurant. He serves a limited selection of dishes, many of which he has invented.

Don’t leave without trying Ethiopia’s favourite dish, the doro wat (a spicy chicken stew that can be tempered with injera and mild goat cheese). On Wednesdays and Fridays, traditional fasting days when no animal products should be eaten, shiro wat (a mild nutty-tasting stew made from chickpea flour) is served instead. Although shiro is a common and easily made dish, Chane’s shiro is widely regarded as the best in town.

Yod Abyssinia

Yod Abyssinia highlights all of the cultures and cuisines that Ethiopia has to offer. A lot of effort has been put in to make the place look as authentic as possible. The spacious main hall is designed to resemble a typical hut and is full of eye-catching materials, from traditional hand-woven curtains to serving dishes made of woven grass. Diners sit at the traditional tables and chairs, wide, short wooden tables surrounded by three-legged stools. Yod Abyssinia serves nearly all of the dishes from the country’s many ethnicities, and the food is presented by culturally dressed staff. During the day, the mood is calm and relaxed, but at night, the meal is accompanied by a traditional music and dance performance. Pack your dancing shoes because guests are encouraged to join in. You’ll find Yod Abyssinia behind the Millennium Hall in Bole, near the airport.

Brundo Butchery

Ethiopia is home to people of diverse ethnicities, and the mix of their tastes and cultures has produced some amazing cuisine. Raw meat is one of most the highly regarded Ethiopian dishes, and it’s usually reserved for special occasions. Even if you’re not celebrating, you can try one of Brundo’s many popular meat dishes, such as kurt (raw meat taken from the choicest parts of an ox) and tibs (cooked beef tips).

However, the restaurant is best known for its kitfo, which is made from the softest and reddest parts of the meat, which is ground and mixed with spiced butter and mitmita (a spice made of ground birds eye chilli pepper, salt, cardamom seeds and cloves). If you don’t like the taste of the raw meat, ask for a heated kitfo, called kitfo leb leb, which looks like highly seasoned minced beef. Tej, a traditional Ethiopian alcohol made from fermented honey, is the perfect accompaniment to such a meal and is also served here.

Copenhagen’s neighbourhoods Guide

Indre By: the tourist hub

The popular inner city is the heart of Copenhagen, and its most visited neighbourhood. Nyhavn is just one of many major sights in this part of the city, which is also home to the family-friendly Tivoli Gardensamusement park, Strøget, the lively pedestrianised shopping street, and the fabled Little Mermaid statue, which sits right on the edge of the city centre.

This historic area is a fantastic place to explore many of the city’s cobblestone streets, charming squares, and excellent museums. At the royal residence of Amalienborg Slot, visitors can watch the Changing of the Guard and try to get a glimpse of the Queen, while Christiansborg Palace offers a look into the workings of Denmark’s monarchy and government.

Indre By is also a foodie paradise, home to many of the city’s top restaurants, including Michelin-starred AOC and Kokkeriet, the more modest yet fabulous Höst and Uformel, as well as the wonderful market Torvehallerne, packed with vendors selling fresh produce.

Though it’s not the easiest place to go off the beaten path, the abundance of sights, flavours, and experiences in bustling Indre By, combined with its lively atmosphere, makes it a must-see for any visitor.

Vesterbro: the happening hotspot

Once the most destitute area of the city, Vesterbro is still Copenhagen’s red-light district, though it’s not quite as seedy as similar areas in Amsterdam or Berlin. The neighbourhood’s vintage shops and summertime street markets give it a local and independent vibe, while the street art here is perhaps the best in the city.

Vesterbro is a neighbourhood in transition, with an emerging reputation for good food and family living. Amid the sex shops and erotic dance clubs sit fashionable cafes like Mad & Kaffe, craft breweries including the acclaimed Mikkeller, and family-friendly parks such as the unique Skyebanehave. Kødbyen – The Meatpacking District – is chock full of fantastic restaurants featuring everything from innovative seafood at Kødbyens Fiskebar to down-home barbecue and beers at WarPigs.

Nørrebro: the melting pot

Vibrant Nørrebro sits just across Queen Louise’s bridge from Indre By, but has a completely different feel. Arguably the most diverse area of Copenhagen, the streets of Nørrebro are a mishmash of international grocery and clothing shops, lined up alongside secondhand stores and independent coffee shops.

Restaurants here run the gamut from Michelin-starred Relæ and Kiin Kiin (kiin.dk), to the noodles and pub food of craft beer meccas Ramen to Biiru (ramentobiiru.dk) and Nørrebro Bryghus. International flavours are well represented too, with restaurants such as Ma’ed Ethiopian (facebook.com/Maed-Ethiopian-Restaurant), and the legendary Kebabistan on Nørrebrogade.

Jægersborggade, once a haunt of bikers and drug dealers, is now home to quirky shops selling everything from liquid nitrogen ice cream to cacti, while Ravnsborggade tempts with antique and vintage shops.

Assistens Kirkegård cemetery is not only the resting place of famous Danes like Hans Christian Andersen and Søren Kirkegaard, but also acts as a leafy green space perfect for quiet strolls. The sense of diversity and community is perhaps strongest at Superkilen, a unique and colourful park space furnished with sculptural pieces from around the world, representing an international spirit.

Østerbro: the suburb in the city

The least touristed of Copenhagen’s major neighbourhoods, upmarket Østerbro is a great place to get a glimpse of local life. Mainly residential, Østerbro offers an escape from the visiting crowds while still providing plenty of opportunities for dining, shopping, and enjoying the outdoors. The main street, Østerbrogade, is packed with exclusive boutiques such as Normann Copenhagen, in addition to coffee shops and cafes, including a branch of the fabulous porridge cafe Grød.

The expansive Fælledparken is a green oasis in the shadow of Parken Stadium (parken.dk), the unlikely home of Denmark’s only three-Michelin-starred restaurant, Geranium. Take in the area with a stroll along the easternmost of Copenhagen’s chain of lakes, or admire the colourful homes on Brumleby and Olufsvej.

Christianshavn: the intriguing island

Boats line the picturesque, Amsterdam-inspired canal of this artificial island in the city centre, lending a maritime feel. Locals sit along the water’s edge in the summer months, enjoying a picnic or a cold drink, while brave souls can climb the 400 steps up the golden spiral spire of the Church of Our Saviour for sweeping views of Copenhagen. The very modern Copenhagen Opera House is also found here, directly across the harbour from Amalienborg Palace.

In contrast is the Free Town of Christiania, a 34-hectare patch of land home to a commune-style alternative society formed in 1971.

 

walking in Snowdonia

 In the early hours of 2 June 1953, guests sleeping at the Pen-y-Gwryd Hotel (pyg.co.uk) heard an urgent knocking on their doors and were instructed by the proprietor to assemble downstairs. They were among the first to learn that mortals had stood on the highest point on Earth, finding out not long after Queen Elizabeth II, who was crowned later that day. Glühwein was served in celebration.

A version of this triumphant scene could have played out in a chalet in Switzerland or a log cabin in Alaska. However, the spiritual home of the British 1953 Everest expedition was a little pub in a blustery mountain pass in Snowdonia, which served as their training base. Staying at the Pen-y-Gwryd Hotel, these men tested themselves against the surrounding Welsh mountains – peaks that measured beside the Andes or the Alps as mere molehills. They can be ascended after a fry-up and descended in time for a pint before teatime. And yet these modest peaks have a long, unlikely association with humankind’s most heroic mountaineering feats.

‘These are small mountains of course,’ explains the current owner of Pen-y-Gwryd, Rupert Pullee, leaning on the timber bar. ‘But they are mountains nonetheless, and they need to be respected.’

He shows me cabinets full of memorabilia donated by expedition members. There is the rope that tethered Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary together. There are oxygen canisters with faded Union Jack insignia – tested on the Snowdonian peak of Tryfan (918m) before being put to use in the Himalayas (more than 8,000m). Over the fireplace is a pebble from Everest’s summit pocketed by Hillary. And there are yellowing pictures of expedition members attending reunions at Pen-y-Gwryd over the years – their hair whitening and their numbers dwindling with each photograph, until the series stops in the late nineties.

The hotel itself has changed little in the half-century since the expedition members first came here. Walkers and climbers congregate by log fires after the afternoon sun sinks into the Irish Sea. Staying guests are summoned to breakfast by a gong, to eat boiled eggs kept warm in individual woollen hats. There are relics from the hotel’s past as a mountain rescue post, too: when barmen and willing customers would put down their pints and step outside to find lost souls on the mountain. And there is a guestlist of ghosts.

Rupert tells me about a 19th-century carriage driver he once saw smiling back at him from behind the bar. Other staff speak of a spectral runner on the A498 outside the hotel. And there is talk of a sudden chill in the games room, where the bodies of the injured and deceased were taken after they were carried off the mountainside.

One snowy January morning in 2014, Dan Arkle achieved a mountaineering first. He arrived at the top of Crib Goch – among the most treacherous routes to Snowdon’s summit – and set about traversing its icy knife-edge ridge. The feat was not especially notable, were it not for the fact that Dan did it at night, completely in the nude.

Nor was Dan’s the only first on Snowdon in recent times. In 2011, Craig Williams made two trips to the summit in his Vauxhall Frontera. The Frontera was later put on eBay, and Williams put in prison. There are people who have carried fridges and ironing boards to the top of Snowdon. Others have climbed the mountain dressed as stormtroopers from Star Wars.

Top 6 Budget Honeymoons

  Morocco

Arabian exoticism, fragrant spices – and lovely low prices. Morocco’s hard to beat for bargain romance. Marrakesh, Fez and Essaouira offer time-warp medinas chock-full of character and cheap cafes. Eschew your sense of direction to get lost in the maze-like souqs – the shopping possibilities are plentiful, with everything from carpets to babouches to be snapped up. Converted riads (traditional courtyard houses) offer accommodation with oodles of atmosphere; some are pricey but many are astonishingly reasonable, enabling palace-like stays on a pauper’s budget.

India

Long-favoured by the impecunious, India has become more expensive – but, mostly, it’s still amazingly cheap. For instance, opulent Palace On Wheels trains might be dear, but even budget ’mooners can afford first-class on India Rail – a Delhi-Udaipur overnighter costs around US$20 second-class, and only US$10 more in first-class sleeper.

Vietnam

You could get by for less than US$10 a day in Vietnam and still eat like a king – it’s street-food heaven. Make sure to sample the city’s signature dishes: beef pho, bun cha (barbecued pork with rice noodles) and chow a bánh mì (baguette) as you wander. A mid-range trip won’t break the bank either, but will buy more characterful guesthouses, a better Halong Bay cruise and memorable experiences (a cookery class, a cycle aroundHoi An) with change left for a beach stay on beautiful Phu Quoc Island.

Indonesia

Numbers are high, costs are low in Indonesia. Rooms might start from a startling-sounding 350,000 rupiah – but that’s only US$25. It’s easy to be a millionaire here, so even budget ’mooners can afford plenty of fun. Obvious-choice Bali has great beaches, boutique stays, culture in Ubud, cracking surf. But Indonesia has 17,000 isles! Consider Lombok and theGili Islands, culture and volcanoes on Java and jungle adventures onSumatra.

Cambodia

Cambodia is a happy marriage of world-beating sights and budget-friendly prices. It’s home to Angkor Wat, for which a seven-day entry ticket costs US$60 – ridiculously expensive compared with everything else in the country; ridiculously cheap for a week’s worth of exploring the vastness of the site’s Unesco-listed temples and jungle. Cheap beers (US$1), meals (US$2) and ever-improving low-cost accommodation ice the cake.

South Africa

Safaris aren’t usually budget options, but in South Africa you can save by self-driving Kruger National Park’s 2WD-friendly roads, staying at rest camps en route. Right across the country, food prices are good and accommodation plentiful, ensuring there’s something for all budgets – the winery hotels on the Western Cape are particularly good value compared with those in rival wine regions around the world. The best bargain? The Shosholoza Meyl Sleeper train runs virtually the same scenic route, between Johannesburg and Cape Town, as the luxurious Blue Train but costs a twentieth of the price.

New Trends for Foodies

 Redefining coffee

You might not think of Bucharest as a coffee destination. After all, Romania is no Finland or Norway in terms of coffee consumption and has no long-standing culture like fika in Sweden. However, the city is seeing many specialty coffee stores open, with local pioneers redefining the coffee culture once adopted from the Italians.

The first in town to set the bar high – coffee by day, concept cocktails by night – is Origo. It excels not only at its single-origin coffee, influencing the wider movement as a coffee roaster, but it’s also a social hub where communities are formed amidst Hario V60 coffee drippers repurposed as lamps and doorknobs. Plan ahead as tables fill up quickly, rain or shine.

With two Bucharest locations, its younger brother, Steam Coffee Shop, caters more to coffee-to-go orders due to its small yet sleek interior. The friendly in-the-know baristas can make a suggestion or two. Across town in the swanky Dorobanți neighbourhood is Frudisiac, where the only hint that you’re in Bucharest, Romania, is your Google Maps location pin. Discreet but stylish, the Scandinavian barn structure exudes Nordic vibes in every corner. Pair your Drop Coffee directly from Sweden with a mean avocado toast, a cold-pressed juice and a copy of Monocle.

Vegan is the new cool

With traditionally meat-based cuisine, heavy on the stomach as in most of Eastern Europe, Bucharest has turned to vegan food seeking healthier nutrition. Abiding by the creed of ‘we are what we eat’, Barca restaurant offers the most diverse raw vegan menu in town.

Marked with one, two or three stars – depending on the time it takes to make a dish – each order is prepared on the spot for utmost freshness. A former self-declared carnivore, owner and chef Ciprian Panait credits Barca for improving his life. Almond sushi is a plentiful raw vegan starter, along with a side of artichoke pesto. The cooked dishes, however, cleverly fool and tingle your taste buds. The usually heartyciorba de burtă (tripe soup) is an honest replica of the original, only mushrooms replace the tripe and cashew cream replaces dairy cream. Similarly, the ‘steak with French fries’ is a brilliant vegan alternative with grilled oyster mushrooms doubling as steak, and celery sticks as fries.

Recently opened Arome – named after the Romanian word for ‘flavours’ – comes as a hip alternative in the heart of Bucharest. A bright and cozy design of yellow hues goes in tandem with the fresh ingredients served in this urban cafe. Go for a colourful soup if only for the delight of being served from a teapot.

Craft beer revolution

Romania’s capital is one of Europe’s top 10 cheapest cities to have a beer, according to the 2016 GoEuro Beer Price Index. Bucharesters love their beer, usually accompanying a meal of mici (literally ‘small ones’), grilled ground-meat rolls served with mustard in outdoor markets. With more than a dozen beer houses in town, the devotion to beer goes back toCaru’ cu Bere, Bucharest’s oldest brewery operating since 1897.

But with the rise of several microbreweries and the first Bucharest Craft Beer Festival held in September 2016, craft beer is now setting the tone. Zaganu, Sikaru, Nemteana and Hophead are some of the most popular, but Ground Zero – around since 2015 – has both the unique taste and clever marketing down. The first double IPA in Romania, the Imperial Fuck with 9% alcohol is a must-try (for a ‘lighter’ taste with 6% alcohol, try the Morning Glory instead).

For the biggest selection head to Piua Book Bar, a cozy book bar and social playground on two floors in an architecturally rich area of Bucharest, or URBN Supply Co in the Old Town, a contemporary lifestyle boutique and venue for countercultural art events.